Skip navigation
All Places > Partner Corner > Blog > 2018 > January
2018
You must be familiar with big data and the endless possibilities that come with it. However, today I would like to bring your attention to Small Data which, contrary to its name, just might be the Next Big Thing.

Lindstrom, the branding expert and bestselling author seems to share our opinion as he breaks away from the marketing herd in his new book titled, “Small Data: The Tiny Clues That Uncover Huge Trends”.

Lindstrom believes that we have become so focused on Big Data that we tend to forget about the basics concepts and creativity. He defines Small Data, “as seemingly insignificant observations you identify in consumers’ homes, is everything from how you place your shoes to how you hang your paintings”. Therefore he believes that in order to mine and find correlations, one should perfectly master the basics, Small Data.

What is small data?

Small data is data that is small enough for human comprehension. It is data in a volume and format that makes it accessible, informative and actionable. [Wikipedia]
According to the small data group – Small data connects people with timely, meaningful insights (derived from big data and/or “local” sources), organized and packaged – often visually – to be accessible, understandable, and actionable for everyday tasks.

Difference between Big Data and Small Data?

Big Data is basically all about finding the correlations, but Small Data is all about finding the causation, the reason why. We can comprehend Big Data by reducing the data into small objects representing various aspects of large data sets (like charts and histograms).

 

Big Data

Small Data

Source

Data is generated from external sources i.e. Social media, device data, images, etc.Data is generated within the enterprise i.e. from CRM system, web transactions, and financial data.

Volume

Terabytes to Zettabytes.Gigabytes to Terabytes.

Speed

Real time.Near real time.

Variety

Structured, Unstructured, Multistructured.Structured, Unstructured.

Value

Complex, advanced, predictive business analysis and insights.Business intelligence, analysis and reporting.

 

Why Integrate Small Data with your CRM?

1. Get more personal

With small data you can get more personal both in terms of your ability to adapt your marketing and sales efforts to need of your customers and also in terms of the data your business CRM captures.
Small data allows you to tailor your marketing campaigns specific to different customer groups like B2B buyers and e-commerce buyers. You can get valuable insights into the visitor’s online behavior which allows you to choose the best channels to reach and engage with them. In short small data integration into your CRM can give a personalized experience at every stage of the customer lifecycle.

2. Get real time insights

With small data all the useful customer data is at your fingertips allowing you to make real time decisions. The information together with CRM helps you to understand the buying decisions of different prospects. Apart from improving the process of lead generation and sales, this also revolutionizes the way you market to your customers.

3. Get immediate Return on Investment

Being simple and manageable small data delivers results more quickly. Small Data together with the CRM allows the collection of daily information about the user behavior and then pushes this information directly to your sales and marketing teams. This reduces the time spent on compiling unnecessary data and also proactively improves your customer relationship.

The Bottom Line!

Experts at Forbes are now of the view – Forget Big Data, Small Data is driving the internet of things”.
Small data is real time, actionable data and can be easily collected within your CRM. Together, Small Data and CRM can revolutionize how you approach sales and marketing for ages to come.

Be part of the revolution. Contact us  for your free consultation session.

When launching a customer relationship management (CRM) program, you want to do it right. Your company invests significant amounts of time, energy and money on your software. There are 5 concrete steps you should take to ensure you get the most from your investment.

Looking for a quick hit list for reasons why your CRM fails and how to fix them? We’ve got you covered.

1. Identify your need

Diving into a CRM project without a game plan is a recipe for disaster. Most executives and employees can appreciate the benefits of housing all customer information in one easily accessible system. When it comes to actually implementing that CRM solution, however, it’s easy to become overwhelmed by the scope of what needs to accomplished. Like any big project, it helps to break things down into manageable steps and clear priorities.

Are you implementing a new CRM system? Answer the following questions:

  • What type of efficiencies am I looking to achieve?
  • What departments are involved?
  • Who should be the CRM champion?
  • What is the budget for this project? What are the most important tasks you want to accomplish?

If you are rebooting/upgrading your system, consider these questions:

  • Does your system meet your original needs?
  • Were there efficiencies not accomplished?
  • Are there breakdowns in the sales process you are hoping to correct?
  • What is the budget for this project?
  • What is most important in the reboot to change?

2. Choose your vendor

There are a lot of CRM software options on the market. Taking the time to figure out exactly what you want your CRM to do makes it much easier to find the right vendor. With a clear list of requirements — essential software capabilities, available modules, plugin compatibility, price points — you can quickly identify the perfect vendor for your needs.

When selecting your CRM software partner, consider the strength of the vendor’s product and their experience in the CRM market. Have they worked with companies similar to your size? Do they have experience with your industry, and understand how to integrate specialized tools like ERP or CPQ systems? Additionally, does the vendor’s corporate vision complement your own? What is the knowledge level of the vendor’s employees?

3. Understand the use

Once you have identified the right CRM partner, it’s time to think about how the system will actually be used on a daily basis. Who will use the CRM? Will it be primarily used by the sales team? Will customer service and marketing teams also need access? If so, what will their use cases be? How will the CRM integrate their existing workflows and tools? How can the system make their work easier, faster, or more efficient? As you craft your CRM plans, make sure to include ample time and budget to allow for user testing and training.

4. Create phases

It’s best to roll out your CRM implementation in phases.This allows you to slowly introduce key pieces of the CRM while also allowing for adjustments and revisions. If some critical element of a process or workflow has been overlooked, the entire CRM project won’t need to be halted while a solution is found. This approach also allows managers to gain insight into the process, identifying inefficiencies, areas where additional training is needed, or potential problems for the next phase of the roll out. This staggered approach to release also helps to prevent the staff from feeling overwhelmed by the new system, greatly reducing the odds of CRM failure through low user adoption rates.

5. Reassess and adjust

Once the new CRM is in place, it’s important to step back and assess the results. Almost all CRM projects require a few adjustments after their initial launch. By making a few tweaks to the system early on, it’s possible to save substantial amounts of time and money that would otherwise be lost to minor inefficiencies. This is also a great time to compare the current CRM product with your goals. Check back to those initial questions you answered about what you wanted from your CRM. If the CRM isn’t generating the results you hoped for, now is the time to find out why. In most cases, these problems have relatively simple fixes. Don’t be discouraged! The hard part — the actual CRM implementation — is done. Now, you just need to fine tune the results.

Get the most out of your CRM platform. Take a journey with us. Download our white paper about the power of successful CRM implementation.

Getting paid by customers promptly is essential for businesses as they need cash to manage their daily operations. Delays in payments could put businesses at risk of facing serious cash flow problems. While SugarCRM is a great platform to handle customer interactions to build excellent customer relationships, an out-of-the-box Sugar solution does not suffice when it comes to generating invoices and managing financial transactions.

The reason why SugarCRM has gained widespread recognition in the CRM industry is that it is highly flexible, scalable and extensible. Businesses have faith in SugarCRM since it provides them a centralized and unified platform to manage their complete operations. In order to make the payment handling process hassle free for our clients,  we have integrated Sugar with leading payment gateways such as PayPal, Stripe, SagePay etc.  Moreover, we have done some pretty awesome customizations that enabled them to reap the full benefits of Sugar. I will discuss about the payment gateways integration in detail in another post. Here, I am going to share a few of the customizations that helped our clients automate payment processes.

1. Credit Card Customization

Payment Handling Customizations in SugarCRM

The world is moving towards a cashless economy. With a surge in e-commerce and customers preferring to pay online, businesses cannot afford to lose out on potential customers by not incorporating this feature in Sugar. With this customization, the credit card details of the clients are saved in Sugar when they buy something for the first time. When clients place an order again, payment is automatically deducted from their credit cards. Hence, customers do not have to manually enter their card details every time they make a purchase.

2. Currency Customization

Payment Handling Customizations in SugarCRM

What if your company operates in the global market and has to regularly deal with international clients? Your CRM should be able to handle financial transactions in multiple currencies and this customization achieves just that. It allows you to easily and seamlessly convert financial information from one currency to data. This results in greater efficiency by reducing manual conversions and smoothens international operations.

3. Payment Module Customization

Payment Handling Customizations in SugarCRM

Businesses need to offer a wide range of payment methods to facilitate faster payments and attract more customers. There are statistics that support the fact that your conversion rate will increase if you offer multiple methods of payment.

This customization lets businesses accept credit cards, cash on delivery and cheques on their website. Not only does it make your business look more professional but also empowers you to earn the trust and loyalty of your customers.

Key Takeaway!

Sugar is an amazingly powerful tool but if you do not customize it, you are unlikely to get the desired ROI. Payment handling is an extremely important aspect of any business and therefore, care needs to be taken that the entire process is swift, secure and smooth. Whether you intend to integrate any payment gateway with Sugar or desire to get any module customized, you should get in touch with a firm that specializes in CRM customization. As SugarCRM certified partners, we will be more than happy to give you a FREE consultation session.

When launching a customer relationship management (CRM) program, you want to do it right. Your company invests significant amounts of time, energy and money on your software. There are 5 concrete steps you should take to ensure you get the most from your investment.

Looking for a quick hit list for reasons why your CRM fails and how to fix them? We’ve got you covered.

1. Identify your need

Diving into a CRM project without a game plan is a recipe for disaster. Most executives and employees can appreciate the benefits of housing all customer information in one easily accessible system. When it comes to actually implementing that CRM solution, however, it’s easy to become overwhelmed by the scope of what needs to accomplished. Like any big project, it helps to break things down into manageable steps and clear priorities.

Are you implementing a new CRM system? Answer the following questions:

  • What type of efficiencies am I looking to achieve?
  • What departments are involved?
  • Who should be the CRM champion?
  • What is the budget for this project? What are the most important tasks you want to accomplish?

If you are rebooting/upgrading your system, consider these questions:

  • Does your system meet your original needs?
  • Were there efficiencies not accomplished?
  • Are there breakdowns in the sales process you are hoping to correct?
  • What is the budget for this project?
  • What is most important in the reboot to change?

2. Choose your vendor

There are a lot of CRM software options on the market. Taking the time to figure out exactly what you want your CRM to do makes it much easier to find the right vendor. With a clear list of requirements — essential software capabilities, available modules, plugin compatibility, price points — you can quickly identify the perfect vendor for your needs.

When selecting your CRM software partner, consider the strength of the vendor’s product and their experience in the CRM market. Have they worked with companies similar to your size? Do they have experience with your industry, and understand how to integrate specialized tools like ERP or CPQ systems? Additionally, does the vendor’s corporate vision complement your own? What is the knowledge level of the vendor’s employees?

3. Understand the use

Once you have identified the right CRM partner, it’s time to think about how the system will actually be used on a daily basis. Who will use the CRM? Will it be primarily used by the sales team? Will customer service and marketing teams also need access? If so, what will their use cases be? How will the CRM integrate their existing workflows and tools? How can the system make their work easier, faster, or more efficient? As you craft your CRM plans, make sure to include ample time and budget to allow for user testing and training.

4. Create phases

It’s best to roll out your CRM implementation in phases.This allows you to slowly introduce key pieces of the CRM while also allowing for adjustments and revisions. If some critical element of a process or workflow has been overlooked, the entire CRM project won’t need to be halted while a solution is found. This approach also allows managers to gain insight into the process, identifying inefficiencies, areas where additional training is needed, or potential problems for the next phase of the roll out. This staggered approach to release also helps to prevent the staff from feeling overwhelmed by the new system, greatly reducing the odds of CRM failure through low user adoption rates.

5. Reassess and adjust

Once the new CRM is in place, it’s important to step back and assess the results. Almost all CRM projects require a few adjustments after their initial launch. By making a few tweaks to the system early on, it’s possible to save substantial amounts of time and money that would otherwise be lost to minor inefficiencies. This is also a great time to compare the current CRM product with your goals. Check back to those initial questions you answered about what you wanted from your CRM. If the CRM isn’t generating the results you hoped for, now is the time to find out why. In most cases, these problems have relatively simple fixes. Don’t be discouraged! The hard part — the actual CRM implementation — is done. Now, you just need to fine tune the results.

Get the most out of your CRM platform. Take a journey with us. Download our white paper about the power of successful CRM implementation.

Customer relationship management (CRM) software houses all your customer data in one place. Whether your sales team is primarily at the office, or out in the field, essential customer information is always at their fingertips. Thanks to this easily accessible data, your sales team has new tools to enhance every aspect of their work. It’s even possible for salespeople to check the status of prospects, identifying their exact placement in the sales funnel. That’s also great news for sale managers, allowing them to instantly track their team’s performance and determine where leads tend to stall out in the sales process.

There’s more to tracking sales performance than simply measuring the number of calls made and deals closed. The more customer and sales data you collect, the clearer the overall picture becomes. A CRM not only provides you with a system for tracking the “activities” of your sales team — calls made, emails sent, meetings taken — it also enables you to measure the “motion” of your sales efforts. This allows you measure the effectiveness and efficiency of any sales strategy or activity.

By tracking sales motion, you can see how many potential customers are being moved through the sales funnel by your team. For the first time, you can see something once thought to be impossible: Tracking the ‘untrackable.’

Instead of viewing performance in terms of a specific set of actions, tracking motion allows you to measure process over time, gauging the success of your sales efforts over weeks, months, quarters, and years. It also gives you a greater degree of control over the sales funnel itself. If prospects are stuck at a stage in the sales funnel, reps and managers can collaborate on ideas for moving them forward.

This new approach to the sales funnel can be baked right into the CRM itself, with the necessary tools and processes for tracking sales and activities and motions being put in place during the CRM design and implementation phases. These tools can provide the insights you need to win deals, create strong customer relationships, and develop strong strategies for the future.

Benefits include:

  • Better management of your sales pipeline.
  • Enhanced communication between marketing and sales teams.
  • Optimized demand generation efforts.
  • Greater insight into your sales operations.

To get a better idea of how these benefits truly work, lets take a look from the perspective of a VP of sales. Tracking motion within a CRM, allows the VP to know how many viable opportunities have become stuck in some stage of the company’s sales funnel and can easily track how long the opportunities have been lodged there. From there, the VP can determine if the opportunity is stuck there because the deal stalled out or if the reps didn’t have the knowledge or resources needed to move them along to the next stage. The additional information CRM software provides grants the VP the ability to make educated decisions, instead of shooting in the dark or hoping for the best.

By examining the sales process, it’s even possible eliminate these “logjams” before they happen.

Download our white paper for tips on measuring sales success.